As Brooklyn Rabbi’s House Burns and a Potential Arsonist May Also Be a Victim

To the Community Looking for the Alleged Arson Suspect

We are asking, imploring upon you the readers and the law enforcement community, to please treat the suspect with care, kindness and compassion. If, with emphasis added, he was the victim of some wrongdoing, and that drove him to a breaking point, he has lived a lifetime of trauma.

There is little justification for committing crimes, but there may be mitigating circumstances.

There would be no justice for anyone if he is not given the opportunity to defend any actions he may or may not have taken in the fire as suspected.

LM

Brooklyn Rabbi’s House Burns Down in Suspected Arson, 13 Injured

Photo from Wikimedia Commons.

 

The home of a Brooklyn rabbi erupted in fire early Friday in what investigators suspect was an arson attack by a man who accused the rabbi of being a pedophile.

Thirteen people, including a 6-week-old baby, were injured. None of the injuries were life-threatening, although 12 people were sent to the hospital, including nine civilians, two firefighters and an EMS medic.

The blaze erupted in a car outside a home in the Midwood neighborhood and spread to three others, including that of Rabbi Jonathan Max, the New York Daily News reported. 

Investigators are looking into Menachem Karelefsky as a suspect, according to the Daily News. The Pittsburgh resident, who also goes by Matthew, on his LinkedIn profile accused Max, a teacher at the Chaim Berlin Yeshiva, of being a pedophile.

A phone number listed on Karelefsky’s LinkedIn profile leads to a voicemail message in Hebrew that says “May the name and memory of Rabbi Max be erased, simply, really, forever.”

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Credit Card Swiping Schemes – The Trade for Points, Is this Points Laundering?

Collecting Points for Charges Without Providing any Services or Items for those Charges

NATURE OF ACTION (Directly From the Complaint)

1. This action arises from certain of the defendants (hereinafter the “Merchant
Defendants”) fraudulent charging of the American Express, Visa, MasterCard and Discover branded credit and charge cards previously issued to the Plaintiffs (hereinafter the “Cards”) by American Express, Chase and certain other defendants (the “Card Issuer Defendants”), which  fraudulent payment card transactions (the “Card Transactions”) were electronically processed by other defendants (the “Card Processor Defendants”). The Merchant Defendants provided no goods, services or anything of value to the Plaintiffs with respect to the Card Transactions. Instead, the  Merchant Defendants fraudulently induced the Plaintiffs to allow the Merchant Defendants to utilize the Plaintiffs’ Cards to ostensibly purchase goods that the Merchant Defendants were planning to re-sell, with the promise that the Merchant Defendants were then going to use the proceeds from the sale of the goods to pay the full amount of the balances due to the Card Issuer Defendants for those Card Transactions prior to the payment due date.

2. The Plaintiffs understood the Card Transactions to be a proper use of their Cards
for the purchase of cash or cash equivalents from the Merchant Defendants, consistent with the  manner that the Merchant Defendants had been utilizing other cardholders’ cards for many years  (which prior transactions had significantly benefited the Card Issuer Defendants and the Card  Processor Defendants, who received substantial revenue in the form of processing fees for the prior
transactions). Indeed, virtually all of the Plaintiffs had previously engaged in virtually identical payment card transactions with the Merchant Defendants, for which previous card transactions the  Merchant Defendants had in fact paid cash or cash equivalents to the Plaintiffs themselves or on  behalf of the Plaintiffs to the Card Issuer Defendants.

3. Despite due demand therefor, the Merchant Defendants have failed and refused to provide the Plaintiffs with cash or cash equivalents for the Card Transactions. The Merchant  Defendants have also failed and refused to provide the Plaintiffs with the goods ostensibly bought for resale by the Merchant Defendants via the Card Transactions. Many of the Plaintiffs were assured by the Merchant Defendants that the use of their Cards for the Card Transactions by the Merchant Defendants were secured by those goods, which would be the property of the Plaintiffs
until resale and could be claimed (and resold for more than the amount of the Transactions) by the  Plaintiffs in the event that the Merchant Defendants failed to timely provide to Plaintiffs the cash or cash equivalents for the Card Transactions.

4. Accordingly, having not received anything of value from the Merchant Defendants  in connection with the Card Transactions, the Plaintiffs attempted to utilize the protections afforded them by and through the payment card networks and to dispute the charges for the Card  Transactions with the Card Issuer Defendants, protections extended to the Plaintiffs through their
agreements with the Card Issuer Defendants. The Plaintiffs expected that this chargeback process  would result in the Merchant Defendants – and/or those who aided or abetted the Merchant defendants’ fraud and/or guaranteed the Merchant Defendants’ compliance with the Visa, MasterCard, American Express and Discover rules, being held responsible for the Card  Transactions. The Merchant Defendants have instead resisted the Plaintiffs’ attempts to dispute the charges, at times misrepresenting to the payment card networks the nature of the relationship
between the Plaintiffs and the Merchant Defendants and at other times misrepresenting the nature of the Card Transactions. Even when accurate information regarding the Plaintiffs and the Card Transactions have been conveyed to the Card Issuer Defendants, the chargebacks have usually been reversed, and the charges to the Plaintiffs for the Card Transactions have been reinstated on
the Plaintiffs’ account statements for the Cards.

To continue reading the court documents click here.

The Abuse and Neglect of the Elderly in Nursing Facilities – Failure to Report and Failure of Oversight

Health Workers Still Aren’t Alerting Police About Likely Elder Abuse, Reports Find

Posted  by Ina Jaffe

NPR [Excertps reprinted from the original to see the original click here.]

Two reports from the federal government have determined that many cases of abuse or neglect of elderly patients that are severe enough to require medical attention are not being reported to enforcement agencies by nursing homes or health workers — even though such reporting is required by law.

Mary Smyth Getty Images

Two reports from the federal government have determined that many cases of abuse or neglect of elderly patients that are severe enough to require medical attention are not being reported to enforcement agencies by nursing homes or health workers — even though such reporting is required by law.

 

It can be hard to quantify the problem of elder abuse. Experts believe that many cases go unreported. And Wednesday morning, their belief was confirmed by two new government studies.

The research, conducted and published by the Office of Inspector General of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, finds that in many cases of abuse or neglect severe enough to require medical attention, the incidents have not been reported to enforcement agencies, though that’s required by law.

One of the studies focuses solely on the possible abuse of nursing home residents who end up in emergency rooms. The report looks at claims sent to Medicare in 2016for treatment of head injuries, body bruises, bed sores and other diagnoses that might indicate physical abuse, sexual abuse or severe neglect.

Gloria Jarmon, deputy inspector general for audit services, says her team found that nursing homes failed to report nearly 1 in 5 of these potential cases to the state inspection agencies charged with investigating them.

“Some of the cases we saw, a person is treated in an emergency room [and] they’re sent back to the same facility where they were potentially abused and neglected,” Jarmon says.

But the failure to record and follow up onpossible cases of elder abuse is not just the fault of the nursing homes. Jarmon says that in five states where nursing home inspectors did investigate and substantiate cases of abuse, “97% of those had not been reported to local law enforcement as required.”

State inspectors of nursinghomes who participated in the study appeared to be confused about when they were required to refer cases to law enforcement, Jarmon notes. One state agency said that it contacted the police only for what it called “the most seriousabuse cases.”

Elder abuse occurs in many settings — not just nursing homes. The second study looked at Medicare claims for the treatment of potential abuse or neglect of older adults, regardless of where it took place. The data were collected on incidents occurring between January of 2015 and June of 2017.

The federal auditors projected that, of more than 30,000 potential cases, health care providers failed to report nearly a third of the incidents to law enforcement or Adult Protective Services, even though the law requires them to make such reports.

“It’s very important that the first person who notices this potential abuse and neglect reports it, because then they can begin the investigative process to determine if abuse or neglect occurred,” says Jarmon. “And if it’s not reported, it can’t be tracked.”

The HHSreport says that Medicare could do a better job of analyzing the data it has on hand. It recommends that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which oversees the health care program for older Americans, should periodically examine claims for treatment, looking for diagnoses that suggest possible abuse or neglect, as well as where and when those cases occur.

“You have to be able to get the data to see how bad the problem is,” says Jarmon, “so that “everybody who can take action has it.”

However, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which pays for much of the health care for seniors and provides guidance on the reporting required ofhealth care workers and health care facilities, has rejected most of the reports’ recommendations.

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Suspicious Brooklyn Fire Hospitalizes 13, and the Twitter Posts and Online Comments of Someone Who May Have Been Hurt by One Home’s Owner…

The fire caused signficant damage. Photo via FDNY

Midwood fires hospitalizes 13, including infant

 

An early morning fire ripped through three homes on East 17th Street in Midwood, sending 13 people to area hospitals.

The fire broke out at approximately 4 a.m. at 1492 E. 17th St., between Avenue N and Avenue O, and spread quickly to the homes on either side. It took approximately three hours for firefighters to bring the fire under control.

View image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on Twitter

FDNY

@FDNY

members operated earlier this morning on scene of a 4-alarm fire at 1492 E 17 St in

See FDNY’s other Tweets

Thirteen people were sent to Maimonides Medical Center and New York Community Hospital as of 10 a.m. for fire-related injuries, a number that’s continued to climb since the blaze was extinguished.

In total, nine civilians — residents of the affected homes and neighbors who suffered smoke inhalation — three firefighters and an EMS lieutenant were injured. One of the civilians is in critical condition.

The three homes each contained three units, according to a preliminary report by the Red Cross, who arrived to provide services to the fire’s victims. A woman and her dog were relocated by the organization. Spokesperson Michael De Vulpillieres said that more may need relocation assistance when they are discharged from the hospital.

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Twitter Postings from Someone Who Was Allegedly Abused by One of the Homes’ Owners

Our Theory:

The theory we have regarding this fire is self-explanatory.

We have posted the information we have. We do not know if this young man who posted openly about his experiences on Twitter and in the Comments section to another article are one in the same. We also do not know if he/they had anything to do with the fire; or if others were also allegedly harmed by the owner and if one of them took this action.

If setting the house on fire was the result of someone who was allegedly hurt by the owner then it is a moral imperative that we have some level of compassion both for the victims of the fire and for the arsonist.

Whomever set this fire likely did not know the possible ramifications of setting a fire to one home with the expectation that it would only harm the owners of that home, if indeed, it was set by a victim of some other tragedy.

We believe that law enforcement should be obliged to determine not only the cause of the fire but also if the online allegations are true and accurate. We state, for the record, that we cannot know for certain. It is likely that allegations of this nature were never investigated and if they were, they were likely ignored or swept under the carpet, consistent with the status quo. 

Finally, we must express our deepest sorrow for those who were injured and for those who were harmed and lost their homes.

LM

UPDATED: 12:55PM

PHOTO-2019-06-13-12-51-53 (002)

 

ADDITIONAL ARTICLES:

12 People Hospitalized After Massive Fire Torches Three Houses in Flatbush

POSSIBLE ARSON: Inferno Destroys Three Flatbush Homes, One Of Them Rebbe At Chaim Berlin

The Allure of Displacing Nursing Home Patients for Big Development and the Alluring Strategy Behind It

Former Nursing Home in Bed Stuy Is Being Razed for Controversial New Development

by Craig Hubert

2

Space is being cleared for a large new development—almost an entire block long—in Bed Stuy.

Located at 270 Nostrand Avenue, it fronts Nostrand, Dekalb, and Koscuiszko Street. The property was the former home of CABS Nursing Home Company, which was established in 1973. Beginning in 2009, the facility began operating at a loss, according to the owner in a court filing, and began to look for a buyer who would keep the nursing home open.

270 nostrand avenue

City records show that NNRC Properties LLC, which is part of the Allure group, bought the property from CABS for $15.6 million in June 2015.

270 nostrand

270 nostrand

But their plans, unbeknownst to CABS, included building apartments on the property. In October 2015, they filed permits for a seven-story development, which was approved later that same year. Current renderings show a plain facade, one side colored white and the other a lighter shade of brown.

270 nostrand

CABS sued the developer in 2016, claiming “they lied about plans to keep the home operational and instead moved patients out with the intention of turning the building into apartments,” according to a story in DNAinfo. They sought to rescind the sale while asking for “more than $30 million in damages.” In 2017, the fraud claims were dismissed.

Allure Group is also behind the controversial Rivington House nursing home sale in Manhattan, where they were accused of similar actions.

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