Nursing Home Oversight Failures – Part (how many?) Long Beach, CA Among the Poorest

The patient from Long Beach Healthcare Center was rushed to a hospital in August 2018 with an abdomen so distended from constipation that it looked as if she had “three soccer balls inside of her stomach,” according to state records.

She died 12 days later due to respiratory failure and severe sepsis from a urinary tract infection and pneumonia. A state investigation later found that the staff at Long Beach Healthcare Center made several critical errors, including not properly monitoring the woman’s deteriorating condition and failing to report that she had not had bowel movement for seven days.

The Wrigley-area facility in February was issued a rare “AA” citation—the state’s most serious violation when it’s determined that a nursing home directly caused a resident’s death.

Long Beach Healthcare Center is one of two Long Beach facilities that are named on a federal list of nearly 400 nursing homes across the country with serious ongoing health, safety or sanitary problems.

The list, released this month by U.S. senators, notes facilities with a “persistent record of poor care” that haven’t previously been released to the public, according to a Senate report.

The fact that the list has not been released to the public in previous years undermines the federal commitment to ensure transparency for families struggling to find nursing homes for loved ones and raises questions about why the names of some homes are not disclosed while others are publicly identified, according to two senators who released the report.

“We’ve got to make sure any family member or any potential resident of a nursing home can get this information, not only ahead of time but on an ongoing basis,” said Sen. Bob Casey, D-Pa., who along with Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., issued the report.

About 1.3 million Americans live in nursing homes; they are cared for in more than 15,700 facilities. The senators’ report noted that problem nursing homes on both lists account for about 3 percent of the total.

In California, which has the country’s largest concentration of nursing homes, 34 facilities were on the list. Overall, California’s nursing homes average about 12.5 health citations, compared to 7.9 nationwide.

Records show that Long Beach Healthcare Center and the other facility on the federal list—Windsor Gardens Convalescent Center of Long Beach—have a history of health citations, according to the Nursing Home Compare website, which is run by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

Long Beach Healthcare Center has 39 citations—more than three times the state average. Windsor Gardens has 22 citations, including one from July when a resident was found restrained in bed and soiled with feces and urine.

Both facilities are rated one of out five stars on the federal website, indicating they are “much below average.”

Jon Peralez, an administrator for Windsor Gardens, in a statement said the facility acknowledges that is it on the list and will “continue to make improvements that maintain and improve the quality of care.” A representative of Long Beach Healthcare Center could not be reached for comment.

Michael Connors, a spokesman for California Advocates for Nursing Home Reform, said the federal ratings provide only a snapshot of problem facilities because they include only federal sanctions, not state violations recorded by state inspectors.

The problem in California, he said, is much worse.

“There are hundreds of poor-quality nursing homes here in California,” he said. “This list only identifies a handful of them.”

Connors said the problem is due to understaffing, poor oversight and a complicated web of “unscrupulous” companies that are allowed to own chains of nursing homes. Connors said for-profit entities have been able to acquire nursing homes even without state approval.

Records show that Windsor Gardens in Long Beach is owned by Blythe/Windsor Country Park Healthcare Center LLC, while Long Beach Healthcare Center’s owner is listed as Long Beach Healthcare Center LLC.

Problem facilities that have faced multiple sanctions are rarely closed, Connors said.

“The state almost never closes them, in fact not only does it not close them, it allows the operators who are responsible for this poor care to continue to operate and acquire more nursing homes,” he said. “It’s really a troubling system.”

To continue reading click here.

Lesmond Peak Nursing and Rehabilitation – 28 Pages Detailing Abuse and Neglect, Ogden, Utah

LesmondPeakNursing

Inspection report details infractions at Ogden nursing home

OGDEN (ABC4 News) – Incidents of elder abuse and neglect are coming to light after two U.S. senators recently released a previously secret list of the 400 worst nursing homes in the United States and one of those facilities is located in Ogden.

Of the 103 nursing homes in the state of Utah, Lomond Peak Nursing and Rehabilitation is the only one to be classified as a Special Focus Facility meaning that inspectors found so many violations here they’re at risk of losing their Medicare certification.

A 28-page report detailing a November 2018 inspection of Lomond Peak details numerous incidents of abuse & neglect. Inspectors found 33 cases of urinary tract infections in female patients and residents fighting over cigarettes.

FULL REPORT: UNCOVERING POOR CARE IN AMERICA’S NURSING HOMES

Utah’s Long Term Care Ombudsman Daniel Musto says his team investigates these types of complaints every day and things can change drastically when facilities have new ownership or management.

“You can have a facility that’s running great a new owner will come along and it goes downhill,” Musto said.

Musto says before you put your loved one into a nursing or assisted living facility, check out the comparisons on https://www.medicare.gov/nursinghomecompare/search.html.

He also recommends visiting the prospective facility at different times of the day, including meal times and meeting with the Resident Council President, who will be aware of all incidents and concerns. He adds that you can’t judge a facility by its appearance.

To continue reading click here.

Deplorable Oversight – Nursing Home Owners Continue to Get Permits Despite History of Poor Care – Louisville, KY

Louisville nursing homes named in federal report for ‘persistent record of poor care’

[EXCERPTS]

Pennsylvania’s U.S. Sens. Pat Toomey, a Republican, and Bob Casey, a Democrat, released the names of nearly 400 nursing homes nationwide with poor safety records that, until Monday, had not been publicly identified.

The Kentucky nursing homes included in the list are:

  • Klondike Center, Louisville

  • Springhurst Health and Rehab, Louisville

  • River Haven Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, Paducah

  • Woodcrest Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, Elsmere

  • Mountain Manor of Paintsville, Paintsville

  • Twin Rivers Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, Owensboro

——————————-

Problems at Louisville nursing homes

Representatives with Klondike Center and Springhurst Health and Rehab did not immediately return requests for comment.

On the federal Nursing Home Compare website, Klondike Center, 3802 Klondike Lane, received a rating of “Much Below Average.”

Among the complaints against Klondike Center detailed in federal reports is a failure by staff in May 2018 to immediately notify a resident’s doctor when needed medication was not available to treat the resident.

The resident “had periods of confusion and an elevated ammonia level during the time when the medication was not administered,” according to the report.

Klondike Center’s failure to have “an effective system in place” to ensure physicians were notified when residents did not receive their medications “has caused or is likely to cause serious injury, harm, impairment or death to a resident,” the report noted.

In August 2018, a resident accused a male staffer at Klondike Center of sexual assault. Investigators determined the facility did not remove the alleged perpetrator from his role to “prevent the potential for further abuse.”

Klondike Center also failed to train staff on abuse prevention after the allegation, according to the report.

The nursing home was hit with a $13,627 fine in November 2018 and a $104,878 fine in October 2017, according to records.

Springhurst Health and Rehab, 3001 N. Hurstbourne Parkway, also received a one-star rating on Medicare.gov and has received numerous complaints in the past few years.

In January, investigators said a medication cart was left unlocked and unattended with two drawers open in the middle of a hallway.

Investigators also described in undated incidents how open food items with no dates or labels and expired food and drinks were found in Springhurst Health and Rehab.

A walk-in freezer had no thermometer and chemicals were stored in areas where food was prepared, according to reports.

Springhurst Health and Rehab has received 23 health citations, according to its Nursing Home Compare page, well above the average of 5.3 citations given to facilities in Kentucky and 7.9 given nationwide.

The nursing home was hit with fines of $250,023 in May 2018 and $88,021 in May 2017, according to the Nursing Home Compare website.

River Haven Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Paducah also was mentioned among cases of nursing home neglect and abuse in the Senate report.

One resident at the facility who suffered from a burn wound and was receiving treatment that included a skin graft did not have their “dressing changed or showers administered as ordered,” according to the report.

State investigators at the Paducah facility found the individual “lying in bed with a large amount of green drainage on (their clothing) and a pool of green drainage on the bed sheets,” the Senate report said.

The resident told investigators they were not sure the last time their clothing had been changed.

“As evidenced by this report, oversight of America’s poorest quality nursing homes falls short of what taxpayers should expect,” the senators concluded.

To read the article in its entirety click here.

The Frankel Family – Taking on Greenwood for the Death of Joseph Frankel “Abuse is Strictly Prohibited”…

Posted: 3:29 PM, Jun 12, 2019

 

Updated: 8:11 PM, Jun 12, 2019

GREENWOOD — A Johnson County family is taking on a senior living community they say abused their elderly father, contributing to his death.

Joseph and Shulamit Frankel shared love and life in good and bad times after nearly 60 years of marriage.

“He was a good man,” Shulamit said. “He loved the children unbelievably.”

PHOTOS | Pics of Joseph & Shulamit Frankel and their family

The couple met in Israel and both served in the Israeli military before moving to America in 1968 where they raised three children.

Joseph, a mechanic in Indiana for most of his life, retired to Florida. But when his health started to decline he moved back to Indiana for care.

READ | List of troubled nursing homes includes 17 in Indiana

Joseph’s family decided the Hearth at Stones Crossing in Greenwood would be the best place for his quality of life.

There were various pieces that we looked at. [Hearth at Stones Crossing was] the one that we looked at that would check on him more frequently than others,” Glenn said. “And you pay a little bit more for that, but it was one of the pieces that we really excited about.”

Joseph only lived at The Hearth at Stone Crossing from March 31, 2016, until he was removed from the facility on May 26, 2016.

He died less than a month later on June 13, 2016.

A pending lawsuit filed in 2018 claims that an employee assaulted Joseph on May 9 or May 10, 2016, which resulted in severe physical, emotional and psychological trauma.

“Listen to everything,” Joseph’s son, Glenn Frankel said. “If something doesn’t sound normal, it probably isn’t. We were told, he told us many times: ‘there’s an issue, there’s an issue.’”

In documents obtained from a state investigation against Hearth at Stone Crossing, the company expressed that abuse or mistreatment of patients is strictly prohibited.

The Hearth and Stone Crossing also completed their own review and concluded that Joseph’s injuries could have been caused by his falling out of bed. The facility did fire two employees for failing to meet performance and patient standards, although they could not definitively conclude that the workers had injured Joseph.

To continue reading click here.

The Horrific Cases of Nursing Home Abuse – Shocking the Conscience – Start Paying Attention!

6 Horrific Cases Of Nursing Home Abuse

From the Good Samaritan Society Nursing Home scandal to the shocking arrest of caregiver Nathan Sutherland, these are six of the most horrific cases of nursing home abuse.

 

There’s a special horror we feel when we see people being victimized who can barely defend themselves. Most often, it’s upon hearing stories of child abuse by the adults who should be doing their best to protect them. But it’s not just the youngest among us who fall victim to opportunistic predators. Abuse of the elderly or infirm commands far less attention in the 24-hour news cycle, but it happens with alarming frequency.

Those in long-term care facilities are sometimes ignored by family and at the mercy of staff that are either overworked or indifferent to their struggles. In this environment abuse can go unchecked until it is far too late. These are some of the worst cases of nursing home and elderly abuse in recent memory.

1St. Rita’s Nursing Home

When Hurricane Katrina hit St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana, in August 2005, a mandatory evacuation order was issued. Other area nursing homes moved their patients, but the owners of St. Rita’s chose not to, fearful that it would put their residents at risk and confident they were safe on high ground, according to ABC News. When the levees broke, however, floodwaters came rushing in, drowning 35 residents, many still in their hospital beds or wheelchairs. Owners Sal and Mabel Mangano were eventually tried on 35 counts of negligent homicide and 24 counts of cruelty to the elderly or infirm but were acquitted on all counts in 2007, according to CBS News.

2Luis Gomez

A native of Guatemala, Gomez got a nursing degree after moving to Waynesville, North Carolina, in the late 1990s. Over the next 20 years, he would be accused of sexually abusing six women in three different area facilities, according to CNN. His victims ranged in age from their 50s to 80s, with most suffering from long-term debilitating conditions. In 2017, Gomez was found guilty on two counts of forcible rape, one count of forcible sex offense and three counts of sexual activity by a custodian, according to local newspaper The Mountaineer. He was sentenced to 23 years in prison, according to FOX8 in North Carolina.

3Good Samaritan Society Nursing Home

In late 2008, six teenagers who worked at the Good Samaritan Society Nursing Home in Albert Lea, Minnesota, were arrested for abusing its residents. Most of the victims suffered from Alzheimer’s disease or dementia and, according to the Associated Press, the criminal complaint said the teens would spit in residents’ mouths, spray them with water and poke and grope their genitals. While the cases of those under 18 were settled in juvenile court, Brianna Broitzman and Ashton Larson were charged as adults and sentenced to 180 days in jail after pleading guilty to three counts each of disorderly conduct by a caregiver. Both were released after 42 days, according to the Albert Lea Tribune newspaper.

4George Kpingbah

In 2014, a fellow nurse walked in on 76-year-old George Sumo Kpingbah having sex with an 83-year-old Alzheimer’s patient at Walker Methodist Health Center in Minneapolis, MN. According to CNN, it wasn’t the first time sexual abuse complaints had been filed against Kpingbah, who had previously been suspended by the facility. In 2015, he was sentenced to eight years in prison and agreed to pay $15 million dollars to the estate of the rape survivor if he is ever convicted again of criminal sexual conduct, according to Minneapolis’ Star Tribune.

5Hacienda HealthCare Facility

On Dec. 29, 2018, a 29-year-old-woman gave birth to a baby boy at Hacienda HealthCare facility in Phoenix, Arizona. The woman had been in a vegetative state since nearly drowning at the age of 3, and staff was not even aware she was pregnant, according to Arizona’s KPHO-TV.  Weeks later, police arrested one of her caregivers, Nathan Sutherland, 36, after a DNA test matched him to the child and charged him with one count of sexual assault and one count of vulnerable adult abuse, according to Fox News. He has pleaded not guilty, and he is currently being held in a Maricopa County jail on $500,000 cash-only bail, according to the Arizona Republic newspaper.

6Brookshire Assisted Living Facility

When 39-year-old Guettie Belizare went missing on the job for two hours, her co-workers at a Melbourne, Florida, assisted living facility went looking for her. She was later found wearing nothing but her bra in the room of a 69-year-old resident suffering from dementia, according to the Miami Herald. The man claimed Belizare had raped him, which was later corroborated by DNA evidence. She was arrested in April 2019 and charged with abuse of elderly or disabled adult without great harm and lewd and lascivious molestation of elderly or disabled adult and released after posting $10,000 bond. She is currently awaiting trial.

To follow coverage on this topic and the doctors, nurses and medical professionals involved, please click here.

The Abject Failure of Nursing Homes in US to Report Thousands of Elder Abuse and Neglect Cases – and a Lack of Oversight

U.S. nursing homes failed to report thousands of elder abuse and neglect cases, report

WASHINGTON — Nursing facilities have failed to report thousands of serious cases of potential neglect and abuse of seniors on Medicare even though it’s a federal requirement for them to do so, according to a watchdog report released Wednesday that calls for a new focus on protecting frail patients.

Just 2 of 69 cases checked in five states were reported to local law enforcement

Auditors with the Health and Human Services inspector general’s office drilled down on episodes serious enough that the patient was taken straight from a nursing facility to a hospital emergency room. Scouring Medicare billing records, they estimated that in 2016 about 6,600 cases reflected potential neglect or abuse that was not reported as required. Nearly 6,200 patients were affected.

“Mandatory reporting is not always happening, and beneficiaries deserve to be better protected,” said Gloria Jarmon, head of the inspector general’s audit division.

Overall, unreported cases worked out to 18% of about 37,600 episodes in which a Medicare beneficiary was taken to the emergency room from a nursing facility in circumstances that raised red flags.

Responding to the report, Administrator Seema Verma said the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services does not tolerate abuse and mistreatment and slaps significant fines on nursing homes that fail to report cases.

Verma said the agency, known as CMS, is already moving to improve supervision of nursing homes in critical areas such as abuse and neglect and care for patients with dementia.

CMS officially agreed with the inspector general’s recommendations to ramp up oversight by providing clearer guidance to nursing facilities about what kinds of episodes must be reported, improving training for facility staff, requiring state nursing home inspectors to record and track all potential cases and monitoring cases referred to law enforcement agencies.

Neglect and abuse of elderly patients can be difficult to uncover. Investigators say many cases are not reported because vulnerable older people may be afraid to tell even friends and relatives much less the authorities. In some cases, neglect and abuse can be masked by medical conditions.

The report cited the example of a 65-year-old woman who arrived at the emergency room in critical condition. She was struggling to breathe, suffering from kidney failure and in a state of delirium. The patient turned out to have opioid poisoning, due to an error at the nursing facility. The report said a nurse made a mistake copying doctor’s orders, and the patient was getting much bigger doses of pain medication as a result. The woman was treated and sent back to the same nursing facility. The nurse got remedial training, but the facility did not report what happened. The report called it an example of neglect that should have been reported.

The nursing facilities covered by the report provide skilled nursing and therapy services to Medicare patients recovering from surgeries or hospitalization. Many facilities also play a dual role, combining a rehabilitation wing with long-term care nursing home beds.

Investigators said they faced a challenge scoping out the extent of unreported cases. They couldn’t query a database and get a number, since they were looking for cases that weren’t being reported to state nursing home inspectors.

To get their estimate, auditors put together a list of Medicare billing codes that previous investigations had linked to potential neglect and abuse. Common problems were not on the list. Instead it included red flags such as fractures, head injuries, foreign objects swallowed by patients, gangrene and shock.

The investigators found a total of 37,600 records representing 34,800 patients. Auditors then pulled a sample of cases and asked state inspectors to tell them which ones should have been reported. Based on the expert judgment of state inspectors, federal auditors came up with their estimate of 6,600 unreported cases of potential neglect and abuse.

Investigators found that nursing facility staff and even state inspectors had an unclear and inconsistent understanding of reporting requirements.

Medicare did not challenge the estimates but instead said that billing data comes with a built-in time lag and may not be useful for spotting problems in real time.

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The Depraved Indifference in Nursing Care – The Ashmedai – The Owners Who Choose Profit Over Care – Part I

The word “Ashmedai” it is said is used to refer to the King of the demons – all that is evil. “The author of the Ra’aya Meheimna in the Zohar (3:253a) distinguishes between three types of demons: (1) those similar to angels; (2) those resembling humans and called shedim Yehuda’im (“Jewish devils”) who submit to the Torah; (3) those who have no fear of God and are like animals.” [https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/demons-and-demonology]

nursing fraud

[EDITORIAL – IN HONOR OF SHAVUOT AND THE ELDERLY AROUND THE COUNTRY WHO NEED OUR HELP] (updated 6.10.19) (updated 6.11.19)

Nursing Home Scandals in the US – A Special Duty Should be Required in Nursing Care and a Special Class of Punishments Established for Those Who Abuse

Nursing home care is a profitable business. There are “nursing home” moguls chomping at the bit to get hold of another for his or her portfolio. There are those owners/managers with their names on dozens of homes. There are straw-men who act as placeholders so the majority owners don’t need to report. It is a racket.

While the US government is supposed to restrict owners with repeated complaints from acquiring additional homes, those who are serially neglectful of rules and care, it doesn’t. Websites are not up-to-date. Nursing facility conglomerates just change ownership stakes, re-brand their product and start again with a new name and no oversight. Or, they put a straw-man in place, someone who is seemingly the owner, but in reality, is not.  The entire system is a breeding ground for greed, indifference, dereliction of duty, fraud and neglect. When it comes to the care of the elderly and patients requiring rehabilitation, the families don’t complain because they are vulnerable, they need help and most don’t know to whom to turn. The result is a pattern of victimization, victimizing patients, families and even healthcare providers.

And, Medicaid and Medicare do nothing to stop the fraud that drains their coffers. And the industry itself couldn’t give a tinker’s damn about the injury that patients sustain as a result of profit over care.

Fraud, abuse and neglect is rampant. Look no further than recent news article, some of which we have listed below. Bad actors would rather file suit for defamation than deal with the problems. Denial works wonders, particularly if it is played out in court by those with deep pockets against those with fewer financial resources. 

As an example and one that we were alerted to a few months back, a patient in a nursing facility is charged for services he or she did not receive and should have. The first crime is charging for those services not provided.  It is a fraud perpetrated on the patient and upon the healthcare system as a whole. We all suffer for it. The second crime is not providing the services at all. That second crime is worse than the first, insofar as it reflects an indifference to the health and well being of the person entitled to that service. The third crime is that of those who are supposed to be overseeing the system. No one bothers to contact patients to ask if they are receiving care. All are guilty, no one is accountable and everyone suffers.

Another scenario so common it borders on unfathomable, a specialized nursing facility is habitually short-staffed and lacks sufficient specialized skilled nursing to recognize if a patient has a bladder infection, for example. The patient sits in pain, urinates uncontrollably and is often forced to sit for hours in his or her own urine. The lack of skilled nursing is a dereliction of the requirements of a skilled nursing facility. It is also a form of neglect and if the nursing facility is billing on those services, it is also a fraud. The pain faced by the patient is a form of abuse and sitting in one’s own urine is inhumane, at best, and utterly criminal at worst – cruel and unusual punishment.

These types of nursing facilities are rated under a system proposed by the government, one that is supposed to provide guidance to families. And yet it is an abject failure. There is no oversight. The money is lost from the system and basically handed to the nursing facilities to help owners and managers line their pockets, and line them they do. 

Another example, closer to home, an incapacitated stroke patient lies on his or her back for 10-12 hours at a time unless periodically moved, which requires assistance. Alternatively, the patient will and does develop bedsores. The nursing facility is short staffed and does not have the manpower required to watch over patients requiring this level of care. If that patient’s position is not changed regularly those bedsores can ulcerate, can get infected, can cause sepsis. They are painful, excruciating and thousands of patients in beds in nursing and rehabilitation facilities throughout the United States suffer because the personnel required to make sure these virtually immobile patients are getting their care costs money and requires compassion. The nursing and rehabilitation facilities do not want to hire additional nursing or support staff. It costs money taken from their exquisitely padded pockets. And compassion is sorely lacking, non-existent and when the scales are weighted between money and compassion, compassion is not a tipping point.

What is not emphasized in an overall analysis of our healthcare system is that hiring someone to constantly change a patient’s position is less expensive to the entire system then the cost of paying for sepsis. But in the ultimately financial analysis, the nursing and rehabilitation facilities do not get rewarded when they help patients to leave. They get rewarded when beds are filled, even if they are filed with patients who might be healthy enough to go home. In fact, the application for new homes requires that potential owners have a plan for keeping their nursing facility full. The system is utterly broken. Nursing home owners profit from money that comes from lengthened and prolonged stays within their facility. There is absolutely no motivation to help people. There IS MOTIVATION TO KEEP THEM SUFFERING.

Looking to the codes used for billing, sepsis can be charged to by a hospital or facility for treatment purposes. In other words, it is a “billable event.” Moving a patient to help prevent bedsores cannot be billed. The former is profitable and the latter is not. Owners of these nursing homes are not incentivized to keep patients comfortable and healthy, improve their quality of life. That requires “compassionate care” and few nursing homes have the moral and ethical wherewithal to even make that a consideration in their ownership and management of their facilities.  Simply put, they do not want to spend the money, they want the profit and the system feeds into fraud and abuse.

The Jewish community can claim ownership of a significant percentage of beds in the greater US nursing home arena [www.briuswatch.org] . This is a fact. Most large nursing and rehabilitation groups are Jewish run and Jewish owned [https://data.medicare.gov/widgets/y2hd-n93e]. How are we not shaming our own into treating the elderly with respect, dignity and a quality of care that reflects a level of humanity, compassionate and empathy commensurate with a decent Jewish soul? A level of care that reflects and overall basis in human dignity? How are we allowing our fellow Jews to utterly demoralize the elderly for personal gain?

The ultra-Orthodox, fighting for better conditions in jails were able to raise millions in a 72 hour period.  However, they look the other way when their friends and neighbors, their fellow synagogue members, wealthy nursing home owners defraud the system and abuse patients. Why is fighting for better healthcare oversight not as important, if not more so, then prison reform? The criminal element gets more attention than the elderly, those who spent years looking after us and are then neglected.

In reality, in most cases the inmates in US prisons are treated better than the elderly in US nursing and rehabilitation facilities. Perhaps when people get old and start to get sick, they should commit crimes. The reality in the US is that they would receive better care growing old, spending their golden years behind bars then they do subjected to nursing home treatment.

There are some crimes that many of us, those with a heart, compassion, empathy and a modicum of humanity find to be absolutely unthinkable. Among them is the rape of a child, the slaughter of people as they daven in synagogue or pray in other houses of worship and the blowing up of buildings by suicide as prime examples. There are so many others. Sources tell us that sexual predators and rapists have the worst reputations going into jails and prisons and are treated accordingly. Why are those who abuse the elderly not equally as worthy of our collective revulsion?

When we hear about crimes committed in Nursing/Physical Rehabilitation homes, why are we not equally as transfixed by the sheer weight of the depravity of the crime? How is the population not so moved as to lose sleep over what is happening to our elderly in nursing care? How can substandard care in nursing facilities be ignored? Have we as a society just accepted, with some form of cognitive dissonance, that this is simply the state of affairs? And don’t the members of the Jewish community who trade regularly in the nursing home business owe their patient class some level of humanity?

Federal and state websites, which are supposed to update the quality of nursing and rehabilitation facilities are not updated regularly, though they profess to be.[https://nursinghomereport.org/ownername-joseph-schwartz/ ] There is often little follow-up on complaints of neglect, abuse and fraud. The “grading system” is inconsistent throughout the different US states and is subjective. And, it is not uncommon to find repeat offenders given license to continue to purchase additional homes to add to their portfolio of nursing homes. It is both pathetic and almost laughable.

[https://data.medicare.gov/widgets/y2hd-n93e]

How can we as a civilized society accept this outcome? How can we be looking the other way? How can social workers in hospitals around the country be sending patients from their hospitals to substandard conditions in nursing and rehabilitation facilities? What is the duty of care of these social workers? And what obligation does the US healthcare, Medicare and Medicaid systems have to protect those within our society who are being harmed by nothing more than depraved indifference.

 

ADDITIONAL READING:

Whether Worth Less or Worthless, Quality of Care Issues Under the FCA are Worth Noting

WHERE IS THE OVERSIGHT?

SICK, DYING AND RAPED IN AMERICA’S NURSING HOMES

How N.Y.’s Biggest For-Profit Nursing Home Group Flourishes Despite a Record of Patient Harm

Nursing home care: A growing crisis for an aging America

Questions Remain About Pennsylvania’s Vetting of Skyline Healthcare

Elder Abuse in Residential Long-Term Care Settings: What Is Known and What Information Is Needed?

Esformes will appeal convictions on 20 charges in $1.3 billion healthcare fraud case

Nursing Homes Held by Skyline Owner Face Crisis, Bouncing Paychecks in Mass.

Ex-independent living home employee found guilty of elder abuse

It’s a scheme’: Nursing homes owe thousands to Fall River pharmacy

Federal Way woman must repay state in workers’ comp scam

Nursing Home Abuse Statistics

The statistics reflecting incidents of abuse involving elderly residents in nursing homes and care facilities are both staggering and disheartening. At the broadest level, more than two (2) million cases of elder abuse are reported every year, and almost one (1) out of every ten (10) elderly individuals will experience some form of elder abuse. Moreover, virtually all parties working closely with the elderly on topics such as nursing home abuse have noted that the overwhelming majority of abuse incidents remain unreported. Sadly, while those figures reflect a national epidemic of violating the vulnerable, but also, most likely grossly understate the problem of elder abuse in the United States.