Nursing Home Abuse – Woman, 91, Terrorized [VIDEO] – Conditions at Nursing Homes and Oversight

 

The following is a review of the Abington of Glenview Nursing Facility:

abington of Glenview reviews

Family sues Glenview nursing home over video of aides taunting woman, 91, with dementia; aides charged and fired

GLENVIEW, Ill. (WLS) — Two nursing home aides in north suburban Glenview have been fired and charged after a Snapchat video showed them taunting a 91-year-old woman with dementia.

Margaret Collins’ family is outraged, and taking legal action. The family’s lawsuit seeks more than $1 million in damages and alleges the nursing home, despite that video, turned a blind eye.

In the video Collins appears to be in distress, arms flailing as she pushes away a hospital gown.

“She’s waving her arms because of one reason. She doesn’t have mobility to get away. That’s the only option she has to protect herself,” said Tom Collins, her son.

Collins’ family said the great grandmother has dementia, and was known by workers at the Abington nursing home of Glenview to dislike hospital gowns.

The video of the encounter, four days before Christmas, was posted to Snapchat with the caption “Margaret hates gowns” and two laughing face emojis.

“You’re just like, this is somebody’s sick idea of entertainment?” said Joan Biebel, daughter.

The family is now suing the Abington and the two nursing assistants, Brayan Cortez and Jamie Montesa. Cortez and Montesa are also charged with misdemeanor disorderly conduct.

“Margaret’s privacy was clearly violated,” said John Perconti, attorney for the family. “They had no right to have cell phones in there.”

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FIGHTING BACK! Pt. 3 – Otswego, NY Nursing Home Families and Members – Report Abuse, Neglect and Safety Standards

NY knew for years about Oswego nursing home’s leaky roof, but didn’t get action

 

OSWEGO, N.Y. — A state agency responsible for safeguarding nursing home residents knew for years the roof of an Oswego nursing home was leaking water into residents’ rooms, but did not make the facility fix the problem.

The roof finally got repaired when the City of Oswego threatened to shut down the 80-bed Pontiac Nursing Home in March after a resident complained to the city’s code enforcement department. A city inspector found an elaborate jerry-rigged system of hoses and buckets collecting water leaks affecting about 20 residents. In some rooms, hoses running down from ceilings were wrapped around electrical outlets then threaded out windows.

The roof had been leaking for seven years, Syracuse.com/The Post-Standard revealed in a story last week.

The state Health Department is supposed to inspect every nursing home at least once every 16 months and make homes correct deficiencies.

But an advocate for nursing home residents said the situation at Pontiac Nursing Home shows the Health Department is not aggressive enough.

Richard Mollot of the Long Term Care Community Coalition, a group based in Manhattan, criticized the health department for not slapping Pontiac with financial penalties in recent years to get it to fix the roof. “If you have citations and there is no penalty associated with them, then you are telling the facility, ‘This is OK,’” Mollot said.

Syracuse.com/Post-Standard review of Pontiac Nursing Home inspection reports show Health Department inspectors discovered water-stained ceiling tiles and a hose running down from the ceiling of a resident’s room into a rusty bucket in 2015 and 2016.

During the 2015 inspection the nursing home’s maintenance director said the stained ceiling tile was from a roof leak. He said he couldn’t remember when it happened. In a plan of correction approved by the Health Department, the nursing home said it fixed the ceiling tiles, but made no mention of repairing the roof.

In a 2016 inspection report, the maintenance director said the rusty bucket and hose in Room 216 were used temporarily to capture water from a leak that had been fixed three months earlier.

But the ceiling in that same room was still leaking earlier this year when the Health Department returned March 7 to do another inspection after getting a complaint from the Oswego code enforcement department. During that visit, the maintenance director told the inspector “ … he had been telling the owner of the building it needed a new roof for 7 years, and for 7 years he had been applying band aids to the leaks.”

When asked twice why it did not make Pontiac repair the roof before the Oswego code enforcement department had to step in, the Health Department dodged the question.

“The Department has cited the Pontiac Nursing Home for multiple maintenance and housekeeping issues, which the facility subsequently addressed,” it said in a prepared statement.

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FIGHTING BACK – Pt. 2 – Nursing Home Patients and Their Families, Victims of Abuse, Report and Seek Counsel Representing Victims

Aurora nursing home sued again after resident beats wheelchair-bound 92-year-old woman

Jury awarded other plaintiff beaten by same resident $3.6 million

An Aurora nursing home is being sued for a second time over allegations that a resident with a history of violence continues to injure other residents and that the facility does not have enough staff to properly care for the Alzheimer’s and dementia patients who live there.

The lawsuit filed last week in Arapahoe County District Court accuses Renew Saddle Rock of putting its financial goals over residents’ safety by under-staffing the home.

In October, an Arapahoe County jury awarded a former resident a $3.6 million verdict after he was beaten by a fellow resident, who has been identified as “Anne B.” Two months after the verdict, the nursing home owners changed the facility’s name to Renew Saddle Rock from Peregrine Senior Living at Aurora, the lawsuit said.

The new lawsuit was filed by Denver attorneys Jerome Reinan, Jordana Gingrass and Beth Dombroski on behalf of Joanna Dryva, whose mother, Maria Pallman, was injured in the attack. Dryva is seeking more than $100,000 in damages against Renew and the nursing home’s corporate owners, First Phoenix-Aurora of Wisconsin and Peregrine Management of Colorado.

The latest lawsuit accuses Anne B. of pummeling Pallman, a 92-year-old, wheelchair-bound woman who also suffers from dementia. On May 29, Anne B. hit Pallman in the face as she sat in a wheelchair in a hallway, the lawsuit said. Pallman now suffers from anxiety, and recurring headaches that she didn’t have before the assault, the lawsuit said.

The nursing home has refused to turn over surveillance footage of the assault, it said.

RELATED: These Colorado nursing homes were poorly rated and eligible for federal oversight. Until this week, nobody knew.

Attempts to reach the director of Renew and the facility’s owners were unsuccessful.

The lawsuit also accuses former nursing director, Britny Otto, of violating state law when she denied that Anne B. had assaulted a staff member during testimony about the first lawsuit.

“Despite actual knowledge that it was understaffed, Otto and Peregrine aggressively marketed Peregrine as having higher staffing than its competitors, as well as a better activities program than its competitors,” the lawsuit said. Otto had failed to report Anne B.’s assault on a staff member to police or the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment as required by Colorado law, the lawsuit said.

Renew Saddle Rock’s website said the memory care facility offers “all of the services and amenities that provide residents and families complete peace of mind, while transcending the status quo with experiential innovations like custom jewelry design and woodworking with local artists or private concerts with wine and cheese pairings.”

Peregrine actually staffed the nursing home with only one worker for up to 28 dementia patients during night shifts and on weekends, the lawsuit said.

Dryva would not have admitted her mother to the nursing home if she had been told about the first assault and the fact that Anne B. was still living in the home, the lawsuit said.

Anne B. has also been accused of assaulting a third Renew resident, who was identified as “Josephine,” and a worker who quit because of the attack, the lawsuit said. The nursing home did not report the assaults to law enforcement or licensing authorities, the lawsuit said.

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Nursing Home Oversight Failures – Part (how many?) Long Beach, CA Among the Poorest

The patient from Long Beach Healthcare Center was rushed to a hospital in August 2018 with an abdomen so distended from constipation that it looked as if she had “three soccer balls inside of her stomach,” according to state records.

She died 12 days later due to respiratory failure and severe sepsis from a urinary tract infection and pneumonia. A state investigation later found that the staff at Long Beach Healthcare Center made several critical errors, including not properly monitoring the woman’s deteriorating condition and failing to report that she had not had bowel movement for seven days.

The Wrigley-area facility in February was issued a rare “AA” citation—the state’s most serious violation when it’s determined that a nursing home directly caused a resident’s death.

Long Beach Healthcare Center is one of two Long Beach facilities that are named on a federal list of nearly 400 nursing homes across the country with serious ongoing health, safety or sanitary problems.

The list, released this month by U.S. senators, notes facilities with a “persistent record of poor care” that haven’t previously been released to the public, according to a Senate report.

The fact that the list has not been released to the public in previous years undermines the federal commitment to ensure transparency for families struggling to find nursing homes for loved ones and raises questions about why the names of some homes are not disclosed while others are publicly identified, according to two senators who released the report.

“We’ve got to make sure any family member or any potential resident of a nursing home can get this information, not only ahead of time but on an ongoing basis,” said Sen. Bob Casey, D-Pa., who along with Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., issued the report.

About 1.3 million Americans live in nursing homes; they are cared for in more than 15,700 facilities. The senators’ report noted that problem nursing homes on both lists account for about 3 percent of the total.

In California, which has the country’s largest concentration of nursing homes, 34 facilities were on the list. Overall, California’s nursing homes average about 12.5 health citations, compared to 7.9 nationwide.

Records show that Long Beach Healthcare Center and the other facility on the federal list—Windsor Gardens Convalescent Center of Long Beach—have a history of health citations, according to the Nursing Home Compare website, which is run by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

Long Beach Healthcare Center has 39 citations—more than three times the state average. Windsor Gardens has 22 citations, including one from July when a resident was found restrained in bed and soiled with feces and urine.

Both facilities are rated one of out five stars on the federal website, indicating they are “much below average.”

Jon Peralez, an administrator for Windsor Gardens, in a statement said the facility acknowledges that is it on the list and will “continue to make improvements that maintain and improve the quality of care.” A representative of Long Beach Healthcare Center could not be reached for comment.

Michael Connors, a spokesman for California Advocates for Nursing Home Reform, said the federal ratings provide only a snapshot of problem facilities because they include only federal sanctions, not state violations recorded by state inspectors.

The problem in California, he said, is much worse.

“There are hundreds of poor-quality nursing homes here in California,” he said. “This list only identifies a handful of them.”

Connors said the problem is due to understaffing, poor oversight and a complicated web of “unscrupulous” companies that are allowed to own chains of nursing homes. Connors said for-profit entities have been able to acquire nursing homes even without state approval.

Records show that Windsor Gardens in Long Beach is owned by Blythe/Windsor Country Park Healthcare Center LLC, while Long Beach Healthcare Center’s owner is listed as Long Beach Healthcare Center LLC.

Problem facilities that have faced multiple sanctions are rarely closed, Connors said.

“The state almost never closes them, in fact not only does it not close them, it allows the operators who are responsible for this poor care to continue to operate and acquire more nursing homes,” he said. “It’s really a troubling system.”

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Lesmond Peak Nursing and Rehabilitation – 28 Pages Detailing Abuse and Neglect, Ogden, Utah

LesmondPeakNursing

Inspection report details infractions at Ogden nursing home

OGDEN (ABC4 News) – Incidents of elder abuse and neglect are coming to light after two U.S. senators recently released a previously secret list of the 400 worst nursing homes in the United States and one of those facilities is located in Ogden.

Of the 103 nursing homes in the state of Utah, Lomond Peak Nursing and Rehabilitation is the only one to be classified as a Special Focus Facility meaning that inspectors found so many violations here they’re at risk of losing their Medicare certification.

A 28-page report detailing a November 2018 inspection of Lomond Peak details numerous incidents of abuse & neglect. Inspectors found 33 cases of urinary tract infections in female patients and residents fighting over cigarettes.

FULL REPORT: UNCOVERING POOR CARE IN AMERICA’S NURSING HOMES

Utah’s Long Term Care Ombudsman Daniel Musto says his team investigates these types of complaints every day and things can change drastically when facilities have new ownership or management.

“You can have a facility that’s running great a new owner will come along and it goes downhill,” Musto said.

Musto says before you put your loved one into a nursing or assisted living facility, check out the comparisons on https://www.medicare.gov/nursinghomecompare/search.html.

He also recommends visiting the prospective facility at different times of the day, including meal times and meeting with the Resident Council President, who will be aware of all incidents and concerns. He adds that you can’t judge a facility by its appearance.

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Deplorable Oversight – Nursing Home Owners Continue to Get Permits Despite History of Poor Care – Louisville, KY

Louisville nursing homes named in federal report for ‘persistent record of poor care’

[EXCERPTS]

Pennsylvania’s U.S. Sens. Pat Toomey, a Republican, and Bob Casey, a Democrat, released the names of nearly 400 nursing homes nationwide with poor safety records that, until Monday, had not been publicly identified.

The Kentucky nursing homes included in the list are:

  • Klondike Center, Louisville

  • Springhurst Health and Rehab, Louisville

  • River Haven Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, Paducah

  • Woodcrest Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, Elsmere

  • Mountain Manor of Paintsville, Paintsville

  • Twin Rivers Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, Owensboro

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Problems at Louisville nursing homes

Representatives with Klondike Center and Springhurst Health and Rehab did not immediately return requests for comment.

On the federal Nursing Home Compare website, Klondike Center, 3802 Klondike Lane, received a rating of “Much Below Average.”

Among the complaints against Klondike Center detailed in federal reports is a failure by staff in May 2018 to immediately notify a resident’s doctor when needed medication was not available to treat the resident.

The resident “had periods of confusion and an elevated ammonia level during the time when the medication was not administered,” according to the report.

Klondike Center’s failure to have “an effective system in place” to ensure physicians were notified when residents did not receive their medications “has caused or is likely to cause serious injury, harm, impairment or death to a resident,” the report noted.

In August 2018, a resident accused a male staffer at Klondike Center of sexual assault. Investigators determined the facility did not remove the alleged perpetrator from his role to “prevent the potential for further abuse.”

Klondike Center also failed to train staff on abuse prevention after the allegation, according to the report.

The nursing home was hit with a $13,627 fine in November 2018 and a $104,878 fine in October 2017, according to records.

Springhurst Health and Rehab, 3001 N. Hurstbourne Parkway, also received a one-star rating on Medicare.gov and has received numerous complaints in the past few years.

In January, investigators said a medication cart was left unlocked and unattended with two drawers open in the middle of a hallway.

Investigators also described in undated incidents how open food items with no dates or labels and expired food and drinks were found in Springhurst Health and Rehab.

A walk-in freezer had no thermometer and chemicals were stored in areas where food was prepared, according to reports.

Springhurst Health and Rehab has received 23 health citations, according to its Nursing Home Compare page, well above the average of 5.3 citations given to facilities in Kentucky and 7.9 given nationwide.

The nursing home was hit with fines of $250,023 in May 2018 and $88,021 in May 2017, according to the Nursing Home Compare website.

River Haven Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Paducah also was mentioned among cases of nursing home neglect and abuse in the Senate report.

One resident at the facility who suffered from a burn wound and was receiving treatment that included a skin graft did not have their “dressing changed or showers administered as ordered,” according to the report.

State investigators at the Paducah facility found the individual “lying in bed with a large amount of green drainage on (their clothing) and a pool of green drainage on the bed sheets,” the Senate report said.

The resident told investigators they were not sure the last time their clothing had been changed.

“As evidenced by this report, oversight of America’s poorest quality nursing homes falls short of what taxpayers should expect,” the senators concluded.

To read the article in its entirety click here.

The Frankel Family – Taking on Greenwood for the Death of Joseph Frankel “Abuse is Strictly Prohibited”…

Posted: 3:29 PM, Jun 12, 2019

 

Updated: 8:11 PM, Jun 12, 2019

GREENWOOD — A Johnson County family is taking on a senior living community they say abused their elderly father, contributing to his death.

Joseph and Shulamit Frankel shared love and life in good and bad times after nearly 60 years of marriage.

“He was a good man,” Shulamit said. “He loved the children unbelievably.”

PHOTOS | Pics of Joseph & Shulamit Frankel and their family

The couple met in Israel and both served in the Israeli military before moving to America in 1968 where they raised three children.

Joseph, a mechanic in Indiana for most of his life, retired to Florida. But when his health started to decline he moved back to Indiana for care.

READ | List of troubled nursing homes includes 17 in Indiana

Joseph’s family decided the Hearth at Stones Crossing in Greenwood would be the best place for his quality of life.

There were various pieces that we looked at. [Hearth at Stones Crossing was] the one that we looked at that would check on him more frequently than others,” Glenn said. “And you pay a little bit more for that, but it was one of the pieces that we really excited about.”

Joseph only lived at The Hearth at Stone Crossing from March 31, 2016, until he was removed from the facility on May 26, 2016.

He died less than a month later on June 13, 2016.

A pending lawsuit filed in 2018 claims that an employee assaulted Joseph on May 9 or May 10, 2016, which resulted in severe physical, emotional and psychological trauma.

“Listen to everything,” Joseph’s son, Glenn Frankel said. “If something doesn’t sound normal, it probably isn’t. We were told, he told us many times: ‘there’s an issue, there’s an issue.’”

In documents obtained from a state investigation against Hearth at Stone Crossing, the company expressed that abuse or mistreatment of patients is strictly prohibited.

The Hearth and Stone Crossing also completed their own review and concluded that Joseph’s injuries could have been caused by his falling out of bed. The facility did fire two employees for failing to meet performance and patient standards, although they could not definitively conclude that the workers had injured Joseph.

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