Lakewood – The 10 Questions, Not so Unique, Rockland, Jackson Township, Chester, etc.

Lakewood, a Test Case for Other Areas of New York and New Jersey, but Not Unique

The below article is being reposted without permission, in its entirety from New Jersey.com. We ask that you kindly click here to view the post in its original format as well as to avail yourselves of the advertising of that paper. We have not reposted the video which starts the article.

We note that NJ.com is a subscription service so, if asked to remove this post or any portion of it, we will do so. There is no intent to violate any copyrights. It should be noted that the author of  the article is Mark Pfeiffer, a non-Orthodox Jew. He is assistant director of the Bloustein Local Government Research Center at Rutgers. The rest of the credits for the article can be found at the end of the post. 

We make one single criticism of the article. Lakewood is mentioned as a unique situation, one not contemplated by our government’s founding fathers. We believe that Lakewood is not unique. A similar pattern can be seen throughout New York and New Jersey and likely in other parts of the country, like areas of Pennsylvania with students who attend the Lakewood Yeshiva. Insofar as Kiryas Joel is now the first religious town in the country, it also should be viewed in terms of a possible endpoint for Lakewood, except perhaps to the extent that Lakewood straddles a finer line between modernity and insularity.

Kiryas Joel or “Palm Tree, New York” has been for many years one of the poorest towns in the country. It is and will continue to represent one of the heaviest burdens on public resources throughout the United States. 

What’s next for Lakewood? 10 questions moving forward

Editor’s note, Part 9: Over the past nine days, NJ Advance Media has been taking a closer look at Lakewood, one of New Jersey’s fastest-growing and most complex towns. Lakewood is home to a huge Orthodox Jewish community and the rapid growth has engulfed the town, igniting tensions between the religious and secular societies on many levels. Each day, we have explored some of the major issues in the community, including the welfare fraud investigation, housing problems and the strains on the education system. Today, a look ahead.

By Ted Sherman | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com

LAKEWOOD–Neighborhoods change.

Newcomers move in. Old-time residents leave. Stores open and close. Politics shift.

Such is Lakewood, fast growing and changing faster, dramatically transforming the Ocean County township that’s already eclipsed many New Jersey cities in population.

But where is it headed?

A pair of Orthodox teens share a ride on a bicycle on the sidewalk outside of Georgian Court University in Lakewood. (Aristide Economopoulos | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com)

Lakewood found itself in the glare of unwanted attention this summer after 26 members of the Orthodox community were accused of lying about their income to collect more than $2 million in Medicaid and other public assistance.

Even before that, however, there has been turmoil and controversy, from a financial crisis brought on by school busing to private yeshivas, to unchecked growth and development that chokes the town daily with traffic, to basic questions about the separation of church and state.

Nearly 1,00 members of the Orthodox community listen during a meeting organized by the Vaad, Lakewood’s religious council. (Aristide Economopoulos | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com)

1) Why is this place different from all other places?

Marc Pfeiffer, the assistant director of the Bloustein Local Government Research Center at Rutgers University and a former deputy director of the New Jersey Division of Local Government Services, said what is happening in Lakewood is unique.

“It is effectively a religious community bound together by religious and social traditions that basically started small and has exponentially grown and is now large enough and powerful enough to assume control of the political process,” he said.

The effect of that, he said, “has created circumstances that arguably our laws and rules did not contemplate.”

A flyer that put out by Lakewood’s Vaad prior to the recent primary election, telling members of the Orthodox community how to vote. (Photo courtesy of Lakewood  resident)

2) Can a religious community take over a town?

“There are lots of communities in New Jersey that you could call insular and who vote the same way. Newark is one that comes to mind,” noted Matthew Hale, who teaches political science and public affairs at Seton Hall University. “A Republican couldn’t get elected in Newark if he was standing on a corner handing out $1,000 bills. You could argue places up in Hunterdon and Warren counties are pretty insular with similar voting patterns also.”

The Orthodox community in Lakewood votes as a block and represents more than 50 percent of the population. It effectively controls the votes to hold sway over the township council and school board.

“The fact is, New Jersey is a machine politics state,” said Hale. “Little machines control votes and voting lines all over the state.”

Students of the East Ramapo School District hold a sign during the One Voice United Rally in Albany in 2013, protesting about the decade-long control of the East Ramapo public schools by the Orthodox community, which do not use the public schools but made deep cuts in teachers and programs. (Shannon DeCelle | AP file photo)

3) Have the issues in Lakewood played out anywhere else?

The East Ramapo Central School District in New York, 30 miles north of Manhattan, has gone through a similar transformation.

There, the Orthodox turn out to vote in strong numbers to defeat school budgets that could increase taxes, while electing members of the Orthodox community to the board. Parents of children in the public schools have accused the school board of making cuts in classroom education and extracurricular activities, to divert public resources to private Orthodox schools.

As in Lakewood, Ramapo residents opposed to the Orthodox control complain about the forces propelling what was a quiet New York suburb into a one of high-density living.

The fight in East Ramapo was documented on This American Life, the public radio show, which described a “volatile local political battle” that erupted after Hasidic residents, who have to pay local property taxes like everyone else—even if their kids did not attend the local schools— took control of the school board.

Elsewhere, there is similar anger over the influx of Orthodox families into parts of Toms River and Jackson Township in New Jersey, Bloomingburg in New York, and a group of Hasidic families moving into an African-American neighborhood in Jersey City.

Lakewood Mayor Raymond Coles, left, sitting alongside Deputy Mayor Menashe Miller. (Aristide Economopoulos | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com)

4) What are the politics of Lakewood?

Lakewood swings Republican. Trump won with 74 percent of the vote. Christie won with 84 percent. The town is run by a five-member committee serving three year terms. Three are Orthodox Jews. There are three Republicans and two Democrats. All are white men.

But some believe the true power in town is the Vaad, a religious council of Orthodox men, headed by Rabbi Aaron Kotler, which serves as an unofficial advisory group to the community. They unofficially endorse candidates and push for town policies to benefit yeshivas, school owners and private developers.

Critics say Lakewood has outgrown the five-member town committee form of government, which appoints its own mayor and has at-large members. They say it needs a city government (like Newark and Jersey City), with a direct-elected mayor and wards, so one dominant ethnic group can’t dominate the government and smaller neighborhoods get representation.

Students get off the bus at the Yeshiva K’tana on 2nd St. in Lakewood. (David Gard | For NJ Advance Media)

5) What has been the impact of the Orthodox community on Lakewood?

The biggest hit has been on the school budgets. Under New Jersey law, communities are required to bus kids to private schools more than two miles away. But with 30,000 kids in private yeshivas in Lakewood, the costs of busing have grown out of control.

The state is giving $2.4 million a year to Lakewood until 2018 to solve the busing problem under legislation signed by Gov. Chris Christie. In 2014, the state appointed a fiscal monitor to oversee Lakewood’s school district and its budget deficit. But the cost of courtesy busing is keeping the district in the red, say critics.

Questions have also been raised about whether local construction and housing ordinances have been ignored to make room for Orthodox growth, in a town where the government is also controlled by the religious community. Lakewood has approved 1,200 new houses and 400 units in two years.

6) If others in the township are being affected, why doesn’t the state step in?

New Jersey law does give the state the ability to go into a district like Lakewood, and it has appointed a monitor who has oversight and ultimate say on how the money is spent.

“The problem in New Jersey is even when you have the monitor, the politics are intense,” said David Sciarra, executive director of the Education Law Center, which advocates for the education rights of public school children.

With a board that is controlled by a constituency that supports private education, he said Lakewood should not have control of busing and special education expenditures. At the same time, he complained that the Christie administration has been “hands off” on Lakewood, even though the monitor is there.

“The monitor might exercise his authority, but he has to have the backing of the governor and legislature. There’s going to be political pushback,” he said.

The Lakewood Board of Education provides courtesy busing to private schools, but with 30,000 kids in those schools, costs have spiraled out of control. (Aristide Economopoulos | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com)

7) What, if anything, should the state do?

Sciarra said Lakewood needs to stop diverting funds to pay for an extraordinary number of children using private school transportation.

“The monitor should stop the subsidization of transportation out of the schools’ budget because it’s diverting funds out of public education,” he said.

If the state wants to subsidize private transportation, then the state should provide state funds, Sciarra suggested.

Michael Azzara, the fiscal monitor appointed by the state to oversee Lakewood’s finances, did not return calls to comment.

The next step, Sciarra said, depends on the political will of the next governor, noting that the state Supreme Court has made it clear over and over again that the state has the final say in insuring that children receive a “thorough and efficient” education.

“The state has the ultimate responsibility, which cannot be undermined by local school boards and the local political process,” he said. “In Trenton. That’s where the power lies.”

A new housing development off Broadway Ave. in the south part of the town. The town has approved 1,200 new houses and 400 units in two years. (Aristide Economopoulos | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com)

8) How will Lakewood’s rapid development growth play out?

Pfeiffer said continued tensions among the communities, both within Lakewood and the surrounding municipalities, are likely.

“The outcomes of the current law enforcement investigations, school interventions, and land use concerns may contribute to new policies that respond to the pressures the yeshiva has introduced on the region,” he said. “Yeshiva leadership may feel it necessary, that despite its influence, to reconsider its growth plans as public resistance to continued growth may come at too great a disruption to the region’s civic environment and risk to the institution’s reputation.”

That said, he said it seems clear that continued, unabated growth will create new challenges for the region that will continue to stress political, civic, economic, and cultural institutions and systems, “the outcomes of which cannot be predicted today.”

In the hallways of Beth Medrash Govoha. (Aristide Economopoulos | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com)

9) How does the Orthodox community see the future in Lakewood?

What brings so many Orthodox families to Lakewood is Beth Medrash Govoha, which opened with 15 students in 1943 and has grown into one of the biggest yeshivas in the world, in part because of its distinctive teaching style.

Rabbi Kotler, president of the yeshiva, sees parallels to the Orthodox presence in Lakewood and to Princeton University.

“We kind of watch what they do and how they do that. What has really changed for us here in Lakewood, unlike Princeton, is that so many of our alumni and their families are living in Lakewood and setting up their businesses here,” he said. “Lakewood kind of became a destination in and of its own way.”

(Aristide Economopoulos | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com)

10) Where is the next Lakewood?

While many see parallels of Lakewood in Rockland County’s East Ramapo, where many of the same issues have played out in recent years, the community in Lakewood is expanding beyond the town’s borders.

People in Toms River, Jackson, Howell and Brick have complained about getting harassed by Orthodox real estate brokers who knock on their doors and encourage them to sell their houses because Haredi Jews are moving in. Several towns have “no-knock” ordinances because of it.

Further to the north in Mahwah, meanwhile, residents are fighting the installation of an “eruv.” A physical line that is often a line or thin piping along utility poles, an eruv symbolically extends the private domain of Orthodox households into public areas, allowing activities within it that are normally forbidden in public on the Sabbath, such as pushing a baby carriage.

Comments on a petition circulating on-line, some overtly anti-Semitic, suggest the opposition is not so much to the presence of the eruv, but that Mahwah would be transformed into another Orthodox-dominated community, such as nearby Monsey, N.Y.

Staff writer Kelly Heyboer contributed to this report.

Ted Sherman may be reached at tsherman@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @TedShermanSL. Facebook: @TedSherman.reporter. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

Read more about Lakewood

Race, religion and politics: Lakewood today

10 ways Lakewood is unlike anywhere else in NJ

Inside New Jersey’s most controversial town

Rockland County, New York, Code and Housing Violations – Dangerous Conditions – Yeshivas and Children[video]

blob:https://www.nbcnewyork.com/0d293faa-cef4-446c-af87-dd3e0d6bafd2

 

I-Team: Battle Brewing Over Illegal and Dangerous Building Conversions in Rockland County

An investigation paralleling I-Team coverage found slumlords with illegal subdivisions and “rooming houses” are repeatedly failing local building codes and laws

 

A new battle is brewing in Rockland County amid accusations of overdevelopment and illegal conversions.

Months ago, State Senator James Skoufis, who represents part of Rockland, launched an investigation into building code enforcement. His investigation parallels continuing coverage by the I-Team.

“We’re finding illegal subdivisions where walls appear where they should not be. We’re finding illegal rooming houses where slumlords are renting to vulnerable Spanish-speaking immigrants,” Skoufis said.

The I-Team submitted Freedom of Information requests for nearly two dozen properties in the town of Ramapo and the Village of Spring Valley. The locations were identified by members of the county’s illegal housing task force and building insiders as being persistent offenders for failing to follow local building laws and codes.

Exploding Controversy Over NY County Illegal Housing Battle

[NY] Exploding Controversy Over NY County Illegal Housing Battle

There is a new battle over illegal housing in Rockland County and the mounting pressure by a special task force and hearings ordered by a state senator. The I-Team’s Sarah Wallace.

(Published Wednesday, May 8, 2019)

Many of the files in Spring Valley were incomplete or missing, according to Gordon Wren, the retired Director of Fire and Emergency Services, and a former Ramapo building inspector.

“Slumlords are doing whatever they want. It’s out of control,” Wren said. He added, “Firefighting is dangerous under any conditions. Then when you have these illegal conversions, it’s extremely dangerous.”

“It’s the wild west, and getting wilder,” said Justin Schwartz, chairman of the task force. “The bad guys are doing whatever they want with impunity.”

The I-Team obtained recent photos taken by a fire inspector at a private home in Monsey. The inspector noted an “obviously illegal yeshiva dormitory operating in basement with up to 6 beds per 4 overcrowded rooms, insufficient or blocked rescue and escape openings, missing smoke alarms, no CO alarms, and open/dangerous electric.”

The owner refused to comment on the photos the I-Team wanted to show her. A town spokesman said the violations have been cleared.

Critics say that property illustrates a systemic pattern of failure to enforce building code laws.

RAMAPO, NY- Understanding the “Envision Ramapo Initiative” and Charrettes – Meeting Announcement

urgent ramapo update action needed tonight january 23

Dear Neighbors and Concerned Citizens:

Please read the [above] attached update about a critically important Town initiative that could severely impact Ramapo for years to come.  

It is important that you understand the threat behind the “Envision Ramapo” initiative, the Northeast Ramapo Strategic Plan, the neighborhood “charrettes,” and other related parts of the Town’s new strategy.  You may have already been asked to engage in a letter-writing campaign or to otherwise support the Big Development agenda without realizing what you are being asked to be part of.  

Whatever you feel about how much or what type of development should take place in Ramapo and its villages, I am sure you agree that an irresponsible or incompetent approach to development will make all residents of Ramapo unsafe and is just plain inexcusable.  

For those who want more infomation, I have attached a somewhat longer explanation of the background.  Feel free to be in contact with me directly with any questions you may have.

**Please try to attend tonight’s meeting.  It is a public meeting and you will be able to speak if you wish.  You should find plenty of talking points in the attachments.  It is very important that those running the Town understand that there is widespread and vigorous opposition to this gambit, including from the Orthodox community.  

I personally believe it will be most effective to focus our comments on a very specific and essential set of demands (see below) rather than criticizing everything or simply expressing anger or frustration.  I believe almost every resident in Ramapo wants the Town to stop shirking its responsibilities when it comes to traffic, drainage, and water supply – which are all safety issues as well as affecting the quality of life of every resident.  These are issues that unite us rather than dividing us, so let’s advocate for them together!

**Please forward this email to all of your neighbors and local acquaintances and encourage them to speak up.

**Whether or not you can make it to the meeting, please send the form letter I will be emailing to you separately.

Sincerely,
Shani Bechhofer  

Rockland exec raises questions over voter registrations – Developers Putting Families and Children in Danger

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Rockland exec raises questions over voter registrations

 

Rockland County Executive Ed Day is calling for an investigation into what he’s calling fraud connected with hundreds of newly registered voters for a minor party line he is vying for in Tuesday’s primary.

But Kristen Zebrowski-Stavisky, Democratic commissioner of the county Board of Elections, brushed off the allegations as political and false.

“It’s absolutely untrue,” Zebrowski-Stavisky said Thursday morning. “There is no evidence of fraud here. … (Day is) making a lot of leaps with no evidence and this is disconcerting.”

While speaking in front of the Rockland Courthouse, Day, a Republican, alleged an investigation by his campaign found that three people had filed 559 new registrations for the Conservative Party this year — the majority of which were filed at the deadline in August. 

Day said his campaign found that many of those new votersappeared to be registered in other parts of the state as well. Using absentee ballots, Day alleged those voters could bypass the verification checks and vote in multiple locations.

RELATED: Races to watch in Rockland’s Tuesday primaries

Day also alleged the questionable registrations were an attempt to influence the primary for the Conservative Party line, where there are 4,212 registered voters eligible to cast a ballot in the closed primary.

But Zebrowski-Stavisky said the new registrations raised no red flags. 

Zebrowski-Stavisky, who also is the chairwoman of the Rockland Democratic Committee, said the Board of Elections is not conducting an investigation into the new registrations. 

 

“I don’t know where the evidence is that there is fraud,” she said in her county office in New City. “… This is a political agenda being played out.”

It is not unusual for multiple new voter applications to be filed with the county shortly before the deadline, such as from people conducting registration drives, or for information to be missing on a registration form, Zebrowski-Stavisky said.

But Patricia Giblin, the GOP commissioner for the county Board of Elections, disagreed.

Giblin noted that the Conservative Party garners only about 100 new registrations a year. For more than 500 people to register for the party in one year was a “massive, massive amount of registrations.”

 

“It’s pretty remarkable. … I’m really concerned about what occurred,” she said. 

When new voters register, they automatically forfeit their eligibility to vote elsewhere, Zebrowski-Stavisky said. It’s not uncommon for voters to appear eligible to vote in more than one location due to delays in updating the state’s voter database, she said.

“It’s not true to say they are registered to vote in two places,” she said.

The county Board of Elections verifies new voters through the mail and runs their names through a state database.

In the case of missing or incorrect information on a registration form, a voter may be required to show identification at the polling place.

Zebrowski-Stavisky said there have been no proven cases of voter fraud since she began at the Board of Elections in 2013.

Day, who was nominated by the Conservative Party, is contending for that political line in Tuesday’s primary against Tom Sullivan, who is a registered Conservative. Day, who also is vying for the Reform Party line, has secured the Republican line.

Sullivan, 65, of Nanuet said in an email that Day was “hurling baseless allegations and complaining about routine voter registration activities.”

“If he wanted to create meaningful reform in this county, he would make sure as many of our voters register and participate as possible,” Sullivan said. “Instead, Ed Day is trying to disenfranchise a specific group of voters who are simply trying to exercise their basic right to vote.”

Maureen Porette, the Democratic candidate for county executive, said Day’s allegations were a deflection and a fear tactic.

“If you can show me … proof of campaign fraud, I would be standing behind him 100 percent,” she said. “But there’s no proof; it’s allegations and lies yet again.”

Porette was endorsed by the Working Families Party but is being challenged in a write-in primary for the line. She has already secured the Women’s Equality line.

Day said the registrations were “part of sending a message to me” over the county’s crackdown on health code violations and tax evaders.

Day was calling for the following:

  • The county Board of Elections, Rockland District Attorney’s Office, and state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman to launch investigations into the voting registrations.
  • The Rockland Sheriff to conduct “police checks” on “each of these suspect voter registrations” to ensure they are accurate.
  • Day also was calling on all absentee ballots from the 559 newly registered voters be impounded in the primary and election, and an investigation be conducted to verify their authenticity.
  • The state Legislature to pass a laws requiring voters to present identification in order to vote, and requiring voter registration forms to be completely filled out.   

The allegations of voter fraud have not been referred to the Rockland District Attorney’s office, said Xiomara Lopez, a spokeswoman for the office.

Day also said that 12 individuals were registered on the same date from one residence in Spring Valley, a property he described as in “significant disarray with no outward indication of residential use.”

That property turned out to be Congregation Noam E. Lizensk, a religious school with more than 150 students aged 15-19 that has been in that location for two decades.

On Thursday afternoon, more than 100 students at the school could be seen studying inside one of the large classrooms.

Joel Klein, a board member for the school, said in an email: “The location is a yeshiva with 150 students an a dormitory and it is fully legal by law for students to register at a dorm. Mr. Day knows of this address; it is in fact in Clarkstown.”